Archive for August, 2013

Cheap Printer Ink & Toner Cartridges – Simi Valley, CA

Simi Valley Ink

Find your Printer Ink!

Ink and Toner have become main staples of the business, office, and educational communities since the invention of the Xerography (copy) machine in 1959. Being able to quickly and cheaply create mass quantities of important documents and images for informational, advertisement, filing, and other purposes, made these Xerographic photocopying machines a must have among workgroups. The same principle of wanting to quickly and cheaply create important documents, images, and now photographs is still around today, only it has spread to domestic households and businesses alike.

There are some differences and similarities between what a home user is looking for and what an office or company is looking for. Home users, are more so concerned with being able to print all their documents, photographs, and occasional projects at home and with professional quality. On the other hand, offices, with a much higher rate of printing, are looking to produce as many printouts as possible and as quickly as possible to keep production levels ahead or at the speed of their workflow. In slew of this, offices and workgroups generally trend toward high-volume laser toner printers, while home users go for the less expensive inkjet printers. Although initial costs are far from similar due to the different volume outputs capable by these two machines, both users are still looking for an affordable price to print.

The cheapest printing options for ongoing printing, is to find affordable replacement ink cartridges or toner cartridges that aren’t going to sacrifice the output quality. The best wholesale retailers for printer supplies can be found in Simi Valley, California. Simi Valley is an ideal location for ink and toner distribution since many brand name printer manufacturers are stationed in California and the compatible cartridges made in China, ship to ports within close proximity to the valley. Because of this, distributors located in Simi Valley such as Inkgrabber.com and InkOnABudget.com can offer replacement Simi Valley ink cartridges and replacement Simi Valley toner cartridges at the lowest wholesale prices possible.

Inkgrabber is a family run business that has been in the printer and office supply industry for over 70 years and has been able to find some of the best quality replacement cartridges on the market. All their products have been ISO 9001 certified and tested to ensure the quality meets that of the OEM (Original Equipment Manufactured) cartridges. These Simi Valley ink cartridge distributors can lower replacement supply costs by up to 82 percent when using remanufactured or compatible cartridges. With their prime location, Inkgrabber’s remanufactured and compatible inks, toners, ribbons, and replacement supplies have been hand-picked and tested to ensure the same great quality and integrity found when using the genuine supplies.

While shopping around the web to find the best wholesale ink cartridges, Inkgrabber.com and InkOnABudget.com consistently come up with the highest quality products and the lowest prices. Their low prices are contingent on the fact that they are able to acquire replicated cartridges from China and locally refilled cartridges that eliminate transportation fees and unneeded middle suppliers. Simi Valley Printer Ink will always be offered at a greater discount than large chains and other independent ink suppliers. The main elements people are looking for in a printer, is an affordable price to print while still being able to retain the desired quality on final printouts. No matter what printer you purchase for your document handling needs, Inkgrabber and InkOnABudget will lower the operational costs and the price per printout using the local ink and local toner found in Simi Valley, California.

World’s First 3D Printed Ink Cartridges

3D printing or Additive Manufacturing has been a leading trend amongst the printing industries for a few years now. From creating medical and dental synthetics and prosthetics to complex mechanical marvels like automobile parts and robotic aircrafts, it was only a matter of time before this engineering technology would start producing parts for itself. And eventually, be able to completely reproduce itself, once we figure out how to create data chips and other complicated processing systems that require a variety of finely tuned elements to make.

An ink supply retailer from the United Kingdom known as Ink Factory was thinking along the same lines when they decided to purchase a 3D printer and create the first ever functional 2D printer inkjet cartridge. Being a supplier of ink cartridges and printer supplies for the last 11 years, the decision to create a cartridge was less then farfetched to say the least. It all started with the notion that asks, “Would it be possible for the home user to print their own ink cartridges and (in doing) so save money?” Which soon lead to the team at Ink Factory to start planning the creation of a 2D print cartridge.

The first hurdle the team encountered was choosing which type of cartridge to replicate and what printer to test them in. Many manufacturers’ like HP and Canon have a plethora of new technologies and designs in each ink cartridge, such as data chips and Piezo elements to help regulate ink droplet amounts, levels of ink usage, and general communications with a printer’s software. With such a high amount of finely tuned, specific elements going into each cartridge, these manufactures were out of the question. Kodak, on the other hand, has only ever released two different ink cartridge types, the Kodak 10 series and Kodak 30 series ink cartridges. Additionally, the Kodak cartridges have a simple internal design and only one component that could not be fabricated with a 3D printer, (the ink bladder). After all, the current 3D printer models can only handle one element a time and PLA or ABS plastics are abundant, consistant, and hold no charge which are ideal for creating and testing out new operational inventions. The Kodak ESP C110 was selected as the test printer since it holds the Kodak 30 ink cartridges and is an extremely reliable and popular machine.

The next step after deciding what they wanted to print and how they wanted it to function, was designing a 3D model using a CAD (Computer Assisted Design) program. The team at Ink Factory purchased a MakerBot 2 printer which comes with SolidWorks, a CAD program used as a design engineering software tool. After carefully measuring each component and chamber of the original cartridge, it was time to create an accurately scaled layout or wire frame model of the Kodak 30 ink cartridges using SolidWorks. These 3D drawings are saved as .STL or Stereolithography files which utilize similar technology found in satellites. This technology basically measures light reflection distances off of surfaces to reproduce a scaled 3D model. 

Once a computer animated model (or frame) has been completed using the SolidWorks or other 3D design engineering software, the printer will need to thinly slice the 3D drawing with another inclusive software program entitled MakerWare. MakerWare is MakerBot’s slicing engine, taking 3-Dimensional drafts and dividing them into numerous layers that the printer will be recreating during the printing process. Each 3D printer manufacturer has their own set of software, including a slicing engine and a 3D drafting CAD program.

With the designs being complete, it’s time to print. Ink Factory used PLA plastics to create their model Kodak 30 inkjet cartridges. This was primarily for cost efficiency and the fact that PLA plastics are easy to work with and strong when cooled or hardened from a liquid state. When the printer finishes printing each successive layer, the team at Ink Factory can scrape the newly fabricated cartridges off of the manufacturing faceplate. The new cartridges are then accessorized with the components unable to be manufactured during the printing process and filled using an Ink refill kit. Thus, home users will still not be able to create their own cartridges at home, unless they happen to have access to ink bladders, data chips, and the other miscellaneous components used to communicate with the printer.

Although this is not a universal solution to help lower replacement ink and toner costs, it does open the doors of what is possible with additive manufacturing. I remember the first article I wrote about NASA using 3D printing technology to create a pizza at the International Space Station. The first thought I had, was “this is straight out of Star Trek or some Sci-Fi futuristic movie.” Being able to tell the computer interface what you want and it fabricates the exact item out of thin air in some oversimplified, concaved wall set-up. “Computer, Earl Grey, Hot,” and out comes a steaming cup of Earl Gray tea. How many stories have you heard about a self replicating robot trying to take over the world? The ideas have always been there, they are just now getting the chance to become a reality.


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