Posts Tagged 'ink cartridge'

My prints have Lines across Them

Have you ever seen lines across your printouts? These are known as light stripes, a common print quality issue with ink and toner cartridges alike. Luckily, there is a way to easily fix this issue with inkjet printers, as well as laser toner printers.

With an inkjet printer, the first step is to identify which colors are producing the stripes. Looking at our image of the parrot, we see consistent black striping going horizontally across the printed image. At first it looks as though the black may be coming out when it is not supposed to, but the actual problem occurring here is with the black ink cartridge not ejecting enough ink throughout the page. When we zone in on the lower beak of the parrot, white lines are clearly visible where the black ink is supposed to be.

Printed picture of parrot with light stripes

Printout of parrot with print quality issue of light stripes.

Remanufactured Parrot

The Remanufactured Parrot Printout without light stripes

Similarly, the picture of the boy with painted hands shows the magenta ink cartridge not producing ink consistently, resulting in the same light stripe pattern occurring where the magenta ink is supposed to be. This often occurs with new ink cartridges, cartridges that have been sitting for a while, or when printing images that use both light and dark versions of the same color on one printout.

OEM Boy's Hands with print quality lines

The OEM Boy’s Hands Printout containing light stripes

After identifying the color or colors giving you the issue, the next step is to remove the cartridge and clean the contact spots (usually the bottom of the cartridge where ink is dispelled) on the ink cartridge and the printer with a damp paper towel or something similar. This will help remove any debris or dust that can build up and clog the cartridges.

The final step is to print a Test page of the color(s) in question. This will help clear the nozzles / printheads of any dried ink or residue and will also help stir the ink mixture inside the cartridge as the cartridges move inside your machine. You may have to run the test multiple times to completely clear the nozzles.

The test pages should be producing more solid coloration on each consecutive printout. If a test page prints out with the same amount of striping, or the striping has not faded at all from the previous test print, we recommend taking the cartridge out and cleaning the contacts once again with a damp cloth.

Once the test page is printing solid colors without the striping effect, the cartridge is ready to be used once again on your printouts. Cleaning the ink cartridges with a damp cloth and printing test pages can be done as many times as necessary, and will not damage the cartridge, ink mixture, or printer.

List of Steps to Remove Ink cartridge Light Stripes:

1. Identify the color(s) causing the striping to occur.

2. Remove the problem cartridge(s).

3. Clean the contact spots of the cartridge and printer with a damp cloth.

4. Print test pages of the problem color(s) to clear nozzles.

5. Repeat steps 2 – 4 as many times as necessary.

 

Laser toner printers and cartridges can also produce a striping effect across your printouts. And unlike inkjet printers which are not distributing enough ink, striping occurs on laser toner printouts because of an excess of toner powder on the drum unit. This usually occurs after a paper jam or when printing out a new document after having just printed a large number of copies.

The quickest way to eliminate stripes with a laser toner printer is to open the machine and gently wipe the surface of the drum unit with a damp paper towel or something similar. Once the area of the drum unit showing has been wiped clean, carefully rotate the drum unit manually so a new portion is showing. Simply rotate and clean the drum unit with the damp cloth until the entire surface of the drum unit is clear of all toner powder and debris.

Once the drum unit has been cleaned, your printouts will no longer contain blotchy spots or stripes. If the problem persists and becomes a constant issue whenever starting a new printing task, it is time to replace your maintenance kit. The purpose of the maintenance kit is to clean to drum unit between prints and to collect any excess toner powder that was dispersed and not used. A consistently dirty drum unit is an indication that the maintenance kit needs to be replaced.

List of Steps to Remove Stripes and Blotchy Spots with a Laser Toner Cartridge:

1. Open the machine to expose the drum unit.

2. Gently wipe and rotate the drum unit with a damp cloth.

3. Close the machine and print.

 

Works Cited:

Holisms2014.com. Cute-Boy-Colorful-Hand-HD-Wallpaper.jpg. 2014. Holi Wallpaper free download 2014. Accessed 17 June, 2014.http://www.holisms2014.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Cute-Boy-Colorful-Hand-HD-Wallpaper.jpg

How Inkjet Printers Work: A Look at the Components

Inkjet printers are all around us and used every day to create a vast array of projects from important documentation to photographs taken just prior. An inkjet printer works by creating extremely small droplets of ink and jetting them onto a substrate or surface passing through the printer. The jet of ink droplets is guided by a series of nozzles contained in printheads and release to create a specific pattern based off layouts given to the printer from a computer or other digital device. Small electrical impulses will trigger the ink cartridges to release or eject ink at the appropriate times, forming dots onto the media and eventually creating images and texts. The inkjet printer will be able to handle simple layouts such as text documents and extremely complex layouts that have details challenging resolution capabilities. Inkjet printers are the most common type of household printer because they generally have a quiet operation and can produce photograph quality results.

What components are needed and how do they work?

Inkjet printers have a lot of internal components that affect the overall quality, speed, reliability, and durability of the printer and its ink cartridges. To better understand how the printer works, an understanding of what components are needed, what their functions are, and how they interact with each other is needed.

The Ink Cartridge

Ink cartridges or inkjet cartridges are the starting point and most recognized component in an inkjet printer, as they are the only component that must be replaced when the ink runs out. There are several different types of ink cartridges and they vary greatly depending on the printer model and manufacturer intended for. Ink cartridges can contain black ink only, black and color ink in a single cartridge, just color inks in a single cartridge, or separate cartridges for each individual color. Many photograph printers will even have light cyan and light magenta cartridges to provide life-like tonality on photograph printouts. The main purpose of the ink cartridge is to house the colorant or ink, until being released into the printheads.

Printheads

The Ink cartridges are directly connected with printheads or contain their own printheads built-into the cartridge. The Printhead is where all the magic happens inside the machine and is the component responsible for guiding the ink onto the page. A printhead consists of a series of tiny nozzles that are used to jet out or spray the aqueous ink solution from the cartridges to the piece of media passing through the printer.

When separate from the ink cartridges, printheads are the component that you snap the ink cartridges into when replacing ink. They look a lot like a trough or sunken in bench with small round protrusions arising into the ink cartridges. The round protrusions will insert into the cartridges when snapping them into place opening a passageway for the ink to travel down during the printing process.

An ink cartridge that contains its own printhead will rest at the bottom of the cartridge and looks like a computer chip or smoothed metal contact filled with tiny circuits and groves. Both printheads, separate and included, are responsible for letting the cartridge know when and where to release the ink.

Control Circuitry

In order to figure out the precise mathematics of when to release ink and when to hold back ink, a Control Circuit is interposed between the printer driver from the host computer and the printer itself. The circuit will actually control where energy is distributed amongst the chip and where to remove current flow. This will cause the ink cartridge to open or close particular nozzles to either start jetting ink out or to stop the flow of ink.

The printer driver on the host computer will translate images and text documents into a mathematical map or grid known as bitmap. The process of translating the images from a computer to a grid is known as the Raster Image Process. This lets the printhead Control Circuit know when to energize a specific spot on the circuit, releasing the ink and when to de-energize an area to stop the flow.

Stepper Motors

A Stepper Motor will rapidly move the printheads and the ink cartridges back and forth inside the machine and across the width of the media passing over every portion of the paper.  The Stepper Motor also has a secondary job of putting the rollers in motion during the printing process. This is achieved in a number of ways from belts to meshing gears, a common way to get multiple parts moving. The purpose of the Stepper Motor is to transform received electrical power into motion, which is basically making the internal components move.

Stabilizer Bar

Included with the printheads is a Stabilizing Bar that evenly distributes force on the printheads when they are in motion, moving quickly back and forth along the media. As the printheads and ink cartridges rapidly move back and forth, the inner particles are pulled from one side to the other. Similar to being in a car that is taking a sharp turn, the centripetal force will push you to one side of the vehicle. The Stabilizing bar helps to keep the cartridges at a steady angle to eliminate or reduce this effect. This will help keep the ink formulations from clotting or collecting in one location of the cartridge. 

Belt

A belt is also one of the components found inside an inkjet printer. Just like the belts used in car motors, the printer belt is used to rotate additional parts. A belt is generally banded to a rotating component on a motor and stretched to wrap around other components that need to rotate. When the motor is powered on, a magnet will rapidly start rotating inside the motor causing external components on the motor to also spin or rotate. The belt uses the spinning force of the motor to spin or rotate the other parts that need to move.

In the inkjet printer, the belt is connected to the printhead assembly from the stepper motor, in order to move the ink cartridges back and forth inside the machine. Belts can also be used to assist the rollers found inside printers.

Rollers

The purpose of the rollers is very simple. They are used to carry or drive a piece of media (usually paper) through the printer. The rollers will grab a piece of media from the top of the stack placed inside the designated Input Tray and will transport that piece of media underneath the printheads and ink cartridges before ejecting the finished printout to the Output Tray. Some office inkjet printers that have Automatic Duplex capabilities can even have rollers that drive the media back through the printer to expose the reverse substrate underneath the printheads to create two-sided printouts.  

Paper Trays

Another very recognizable component of the printer is the Paper Trays. Typically Inkjet printers will have a single Input Tray located at the top or back of the printer and a single Output Tray located in the front of the machine. Another common tray configuration is to have the Input Tray and Output Tray conflated into a single front-feeding tray. When both are used as one tray, such as with the HP PSC series printers, the tray will usually have small mounting members on either side of the tray to elevate the printed material from entering back through the printer. These also act as guides when loading new media into the Tray and as a divider between the Input and Output sections of the tray.

Power Supply

To supply power to the stepper motor and control circuitry a standard power supply has been incorporated into the printer. The purpose of the power supply is to convert the alternating current (AC) from a wall outlet to more controllable direct current (DC), needed to operate the stepper motors and circuitry inside printers. The power supply is also responsible for lighting up and energizing additional features such as display screens and scanning equipment.  

Interface Ports

Also included with inkjet printers are ports that allow users to connect and transfer digital data between devices. The most common printer interface is the Hi-Speed USB 2.0 port which was created to outperform the older IEE Parallel interfaces. The Hi-speed USB 2.0 ports also broaden the range of external peripherals or devices that can be connected with the printer. The Interface ports main purpose is to provide a means to transfer data (usually text documents and images) from the computer to the printer and vice versa.

Photograph inkjet printers will typically have compatible media card slots as well, that allow users to walk-up and plug media cards and flash drives directly into the printer to print the files and photographs on the card without needing a computer.

These are the main components that can affect the output quality, durability, and performance of an inkjet printer and its ink cartridges. Hopefully this will help you identify and possibly prevent or fix any issues that are occurring with your machine. 

Inside the Ink Cartridge

Most of us use printers in our everyday lives, whether it’s at work, home, or even in libraries and schools. Printers have long been a part of our culture, revolutionizing how we received news, how advertisers were able to relay messages, how stories and lessons were able to be recorded on a wide scale, and much more. The first printers were complex machines with a numerous variety of components and attachments and needed constant monitoring. Now, we see a printer and immediately know how to operate them, how to change the ink cartridges, and how to give them a proper supply of power. In general, these machines and their accompanying cartridges are pretty familiar and very simple to use, although we seldom look at what is really happening inside the ink cartridge during the printing process.

 The ink cartridge, although it looks uncomplicated and easily slides in and out of the printer when replacing the ink, is actually an intricate component with several moving, conducting, charging, and supporting pieces that make up a single ink cartridge.

The main components of every cartridge are the sump or receptacle portion which expels the ink and the peripheral walls, encasing the cartridge and giving the object its recognizable, rectangular shape (in most cases, although each manufacturer varies). These also happen to be the biggest and most prevalent pieces as they hold and protect the ink from spilling inside the printer.  The sump is also responsible for responding to and supporting the print heads, which act as a funnel to jet ink through to the media. The sump and the walls together, also make up a reservoir for the ink to rest in.

On the diametrically opposed side of the sump portion, designers usually include a small handle with a knurled surface to facilitate the insertion and removal of the ink cartridge. This basically means the cartridge has a protruding handle at the top and in the back of the unit for users to more easily handle the cartridge.  Along with an added handle, the outer portion also contains stabilizing protrusions or datum features at the bottom of the cartridge (much like a stand or feet) to accurately align the cartridge in the printer.

 At the bottom of the unit, a small hole known as the charging opening is also created into the frame or wall which grants access to the ink reservoir. This is where the ink is initially filled when being put together by the assembling machine.

In between the sump portion and the framing walls of the cartridge lies a recessed region which bisects the cartridge. These recessed regions taper off to angled edges known as the chamfers. The chamfers main purpose is to correctly position media when the media is passing by the sump portion of the cartridge. The sump is actually two laterally spaced plates, each with smooth metal faces and ribbed groves on the inner section of the plates to ensure the print head is adhesively secured (or connected) to the cartridge.

A flexible circuit board or flexible member is then added to the cartridge, situated on the sump portion and part of the peripheral wall portion. The circuit board is a crucial piece to the cartridge supporting electrical traces that provide power to an actuating mechanism and delivering electrical impulses to the necessary components inside the cartridge. An electrical impulse will be regulated then distributed to “pogo” pins, a piezo crystal, or an electrical resistance heating material (such as thermal inks) to expel the droplets out of the chamber and through the print head nozzles.

To supply power to the flexible circuit board, a series of “pogo” pins in the ink trough of a printer will touch the conductor strips on the circuit board of the cartridge, creating a pathway for electricity to travel through. Sometimes chips are also added onto cartridges to count the number of pages printed with a particular cartridge and to help big corporations and brand name manufacturers regulate and ultimately monopolize the ink markets.

These are generally the main pieces involved when comprising an ink cartridge, although each manufacturer and each printer series has their own versions, additions, and arrangements of ink cartridge compositions.  

Photo Ink vs. Regular Ink

There are several types of inks and ink formulations when it comes to printing, but they all have the same general purpose; to deliver an image onto a piece of media passing through the printer. However, some ink cartridges will deliver superior results when printing text and others will yield better results when producing images and photographs. The differing results are caused by the variation of elements found in the ink mixtures. An ink cartridge contains a basic mixture of water, glycol (a carrying liquid), and dyes or pigments and are intended to be jetted or sprayed onto paper or media, eventually creating an image.

Differences

The main difference between photo inkjets and regular inkjets is the ability of photo ink formulations to provide lighter tones of each color, commonly being cyan, magenta, and black. A regular cartridge will dispense wider set ink droplets to give image colors a lighter look. However, this makes lighter colored printouts look grainy and even multi-colored when inspected closely. This is because regular ink mixtures can only dispatch color so lightly, being intended for brighter execution to give printouts more vibrancy.

Photograph inks, on the other hand, will produce much lighter tones, perfect for shading and coloring elements such as faces and skin tones that have light colors. Since these mixtures produce lighter color, the ink is not as widely dispersed and results in smoother printouts that can capture high levels of detail. Many photograph ink compositions also avoid pigmented colorants since they do not sit as well on coated media such as photo glossy paper.  Ink formulations vary greatly depending on the machine being used, the frequency of ink being ejected, and depending on the type of printing the machine is intended for.

Ink Types

There are three basic ink compositions, that mostly all inks can be categorized into including Dye-Based Inks, Pigment-Based Inks, and Hybrid Inks. Dye-Based inks are composed of colorants dissolved in a liquid, such as water or glycol and have the most vivid and rich finishing results. Dye-Based inks also have a wide color gamut, providing colors unreachable by other mixtures and are compatible with a wide range of photograph papers. Unfortunately these ink mixtures do not last long and fade easily with light and become runny when moisture is added. In general, a dye-based ink formulation printout will last between 5 and 25 years depending on the surrounding environment.

Pigment-Based inks on the other hand, contain insoluble powder pigments that are suspended in the ink composition and do not dissolve into the solution like dye-based inks. These pigments are coated in a resin-like mixture making them much more stable and giving them resistances to fading or light. A pigment-based printout can last anywhere from 75 years to 150 years depending on how and where the printout was stored and displayed.  However, pigment-based inks do not soak into media as readily and have a tougher time adhering to coated paper.

Hybrid inks are a mixture of dye-based inks and pigment-based inks, and are sometimes referred to as pigmented inks. Combining the longevity of pigment-based inks with vibrancy of dye-based inks, Hybrid inks can be used for a number of applications and often offer superior printing results. Hybrid inks are known as pigmented inks since they use dye-based colorants and pigmented particles together, modifying the benefits and weaknesses of each type. Pigmented inks will have a wider color gamut than pigment-based inks but will not last as long. Pigmented inks (or Hybrid inks) can last up to 75 years when kept in an archival environment, such as being behind glass in a picture frame.

Similarities

Most inkjet printers and ink cartridges also contain conductive elements to help shepherd or guide the ink to the page, usually reducing the size of the droplet in the process, for higher resolution printouts with sharper definition. Both photo and regular ink cartridges can be found with these assisting elements. The most common element that helps to shape and delivery ink is the Piezoelectric crystals. When a small electrical current passes through a Piezo crystal, the element will rapidly change shape forcing the ink out of the printer nozzles. The reaction shapes and can reduce the ink droplet size while forcing the mixture out of the cartridge and onto the paper.

Ink cartridges have differing elements depending on the type of printout being created, which will enhance a project and the overall quality when using the right selection of inks. For example, when printing text documents, a matte black ink cartridge formulation such as the Epson T054820, will yield the best results since the ink has a softer look, making the text easier to read for long periods of time. Using a photo black ink cartridge on text document printing will result in overly shiny characters or grayish texts that do not read as well. 

Is too much Toner Ink Exposure Dangerous?

Most users of laser toner printers and photocopiers are unaware of the dangers mishandling toner can have to their health. The toner powder used inside each cartridge contains compounds that can be potentially harmful to humans when not handled correctly. The key to properly handling toner is being aware of the risks and how to prevent them from occurring.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified toner powder as a type 2B carcinogen with the primary ingredient in most laser toner cartridges being Carbon Black. Carbon dust, which toner is mainly composed of, is known to emit carcinogens which can be dangerous to humans and result in a form a cancer when inhaled. Normal operation of photocopiers and laser printers will not expose users to these possible risks; however a broken cartridge that explodes toner powder in the office can be a different story.  

To avoid overexposure to toner by inhaling or touching the chemical, gloves and a paper breathing mask should be worn to clean the mess. If any of the toner compounds get onto your skin, you should wash the toner off under cold water. Hot water or even warm water can melt the powder into your skin which can ultimately attack or transform bacteria resulting in some undesirable side effects such as irritation and itchiness. Inhaling the carbon-dominate dust may cause headaches, eye irritation, chronic itchiness, and even small growths on the tongue.

When laser toner cartridges inside of some photocopy machines overheat, the toner can conceivably become even more dangerous. First of all, the cartridge itself can severely burn the skin when handling the toner ink cartridge immediately after printing.  So do not attempt to replace toner cartridges that have recently been used to print with. Give the cartridges a few minutes to cool off inside the machine before changing the toner.

Secondly, photocopiers that use toner ink may emit carbon monoxide into the atmosphere when overheated. Inhaling a cloud Carbon Monoxide can cause an increased heart rate, severe headaches, and drowsiness. To prevent exposure to overheated toner cartridges emitting carbon dioxide, these machines should be used in well ventilated rooms. Opening windows and doors can also be useful to help dilute the air containing the carbon dioxide pollutants.  The most common occurrence of this happening is in offices that are consistently printing throughout the day. So be sure your frequently used laser printers and copies are in a well ventilated room before operating them.

Furthermore, some photocopiers are likely to radiate high levels of ozone during electrical discharges that occur each time toner is ejected from the cartridge. And regular exposure to high levels of ozone can cause some unwanted effects, similar to the effects of overexposure to carbon dioxide, including headaches, irritation, nausea, and even dermatitis in extreme cases. By ensuring your machine is operating in a well ventilated area will prevent this from becoming a potential problem.

Once again, the normal operation will not have harmful effects to users. And to eliminate the potential threats mentioned, be sure to use laser toner printers and photocopiers in areas with good air flow or ventilation, wash toner off with cold water, do not breathe unnaturally close to the machine when operating, and do not attempt to replace or change recently used cartridges. By following these fairly simple guidelines, laser toner printers and photocopiers using toner ink are relatively harmless and are necessary office components in today’s workplace. 

Dell Inkjet J740 Review from Inkgrabber.com

Dell J740 Inkjet Printer

Dell J740 Inkjet Printer

The Dell J740 Inkjet printer is designed to deliver high-quality borderless photos with variety, vibrancy and vivid colors. The printer features a resolution of 4800×1200 dpi for the most favorable color printing using Dell Ink Optimization Technology. This technology combines the speed of a fast inkjet printer with the exceptional print quality of a photo printer in a single unit being able to produce 18 pages per minute for black and 14 pages per minute for color. The printer also allows different types of Media to be printed on for printing are Cards, Envelopes, Index Cards, Plain Paper and Postcards. Around 150 sheets of media are possible.

The printer comes with two Dell J740 inkjet cartridges for simple and efficient replacing which will automatically align when installed and replaced.  The Dell J740 also creates high quality borderless 4 x 6 photographs with impressive output speeds.  This is an ideal computer for the occasional home user that will eventually need to copy, scan, and print photographs.

The Dell J740 Inkjet printer only uses Genuine Dell ink cartridges which can be found for a lower price at specialty ink manufactures. For individual purchase you can get the Genuine Dell Series 3 (310-4153) color inkjet print cartridge and the Genuine Dell Series 3 (310-4154) black inkjet print cartridge.


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