Posts Tagged 'toner cartridges'

What is a Toner Cartridge?

Toner is a reasonably familiar substance to most people working in offices or for companies that have office photocopy machines and big industrial printers. These machines inevitably use toner to form images and text onto a sheet of media, usually being a plain white piece of paper. In other words the toner acts with the same purpose ink has, although ink is an aqueous solution whereas toner is in the form of powdery, dust-like solids. And due to the fact toner is a powder, cartridges should not be shaken as the material can spread through the air and adhere to unwanted surfaces, permanently dying them. Before handling any toner cartridge, make sure you are aware of the potential dangers and health risks involved with these units by clicking here.

In its early form, toner was a mix of carbon powder, iron oxide, and sugar. Eventually, to improve the quality of the printout, the carbon was melt-mixed with a polymer. The polymer is a thermoplastic that now comprises about 40 to 95 percent of the toner mixture and is crucial to binding and carrying colorant to the drum unit and substrate. The polymer is often referred to as the “binder” being able to hold the toner powder mixture together, carrying the powder to the transfer belt or drum unit, and holding the mixture in place for the heated fuser rollers to bind the powder to the paper with heat and pressure.

To better understand this process, let’s take a look at the different components that make up a toner cartridge and their functions. A basic toner cartridge contains several parts; one common component in each cartridge is the hopper which houses the toner powder until being picked up by a magnetic developer roller. The magnetic developer roller is a cylindrical sleeve used to transfer image forming toner powder particles to an image forming drum unit. This roller protrudes partially into the hopper and has several magnetic beads inside that will attract the toner powder mixture from the hopper to the roller during the printing process. As this piece rolls, the picked up toner is brushed against the drum unit.

The drum unit, having a greater static attraction, will once again pull the toner powder but this time from the magnetic developer roller. Any excess powder on the developer roller will be scrapped off with an MDR Doctor Blade before passing by the drum unit. The MDR Doctor Blade is a precision leveling blade that is designed to keep only one layer of toner powder on the developer roller. This ensures more evenly distributed toner and helps to prevent the drum and toner cartridge from clogging. The magnetic developer roller also has a secondary blade, known as the MDR Sealing Blade, to clean off any powder left on the surface of the roller after passing by the drum and before rotating back into the hopper section.

The drum unit itself is sometimes included with the toner cartridge in 2 in 1 or all inclusive toner cartridges. And whether the drum unit is a separate unit or has been included with the toner cartridge, the drum serves the same purpose. The drum is a photoconductive cylinder that contains a laser neutralized image of the project about to be printed out. A laser will actually neutralize parts of the drum unit, based off the desired image about to be printed. The neutralized parts of the drum will not be able to attract toner, which is how the drum forms an image, only being able to attract toner where desired on the image. Once the drum unit has picked up the toner powder from the developer rollers, the unit will then transfer them immediately to the paper substrate passing through the machine.

To keep the drum unit charged, a primary charge roller inside the toner cartridge rests against the unit, recharging the drum and eliminating neutralized areas of the unit. The drum also has a cleaning blade know as the Organic Photoconductor Wiper Blade. Any extra toner left on the surface of the drum unit after transferring the powder to the paper will be scrapped of by the wiper blade into the waste container. The last part to creating a printout involves the fuser rollers and some assisting transfer rollers that drive the media through the machine and are usually separately sold components that do not need to be exchanged as frequently as toner cartridges or even drum units.

All these components are necessary pieces to having a functional toner cartridge that can produce images onto a piece of paper using pigmented polymers, colorants, and carbons as the ink or image forming material being adhered to media. The current laser toner cartridge powders are comprised of a mixture of colorant pigments, external additives, and wax substances in addition to the binding polymers. The external additives can be iron oxide molecules, chemical release agents, charge control agents, and flow agents all designed to keep the mixture at optimal functioning compositions. Many toners now have protective wax coatings encapsulating each toner powder particle for longer lasting printouts and resistances to smudging and blurring.

Refilling Ink

Is refilling ink cartridges the right choice for you? Refilling cartridges has its advantages and disadvantages depending on where and how it is done. There are several options to consider before making the decision to refill cartridges. The point is, of course, to obtain the best deal, without having to spend so much time on the project as to negate the savings through your own manual labor. That is the tricky part, but knowing what type of kit to buy and how to fill your cartridges can make all the difference.

There are two main types of ink compositions from long-lasting pigmented inks like ChromaLife 100+, DURABrite Ultra pigments, Vivera Inks, and UltraChrome inks, to bolder dye-based concoctions found in most inkjet printers today. The pigmented inks are made up to tiny encapsulated particles that sit on top of a substrate instead of absorbing or sinking into the page like dye-based inks. This helps with placement and overall resistance for printouts that have finer line detail and last longer without fading. However, due to the rather complex chemical formulation, pigment based inks are not refillable (for the time being). So inevitably, ink refill kits are going to be dye-based mixtures in three colors and one shade.

Luckily most refill kits are sold specifically for certain printer models or by the number found on the original cartridge. The color refill kits contain a cyan (blue), magenta (red / pink), and yellow ink bottle each with an accompanying syringe or plunger to transport the liquid from the bottle to the cartridge. The black ink refill kits also contain a bottle or two with accompanying syringes and / or plungers to help streamline the process. When filling a cartridge at home or by yourself, make sure to watch instructional videos or thoroughly read the instructions provided with the purchased refill kit.

Each kit has some similar steps such as working over paper towels and placing or peeling back a guide sticker to direct the insertion of the syringe or plunger, but they all vary slightly. The instructions will provide helpful tips to prevent the cartridges from overflowing or being pierced in an incorrect spot which can lead to leaking. Once a cartridge has been filled, the instructions will most likely suggest letting the cartridge sit for a moment, before doing a final wipe clean and inserting the piece into your machine, to allow any excess ink to drip out.

Taking a cartridge to major store chains such as Costco, Walgreens, and Office Max to be refilled may seem like an easy alternative to refilling the cartridge yourself but beware. The employees have no formal training in office supplies or how ink cartridges work. They are simply minimum wage workers with no prior experience refilling ink or toner. And frequently, customers end up with messy components that leak after taking them to be refilled at the chain corporations.  

Before ordering a refill kit, be sure to check out the directions or steps associated with the particular kit. This will help you get an approximate understanding of how much time the entire process will take. If the steps are only going to save you a couple dollars but take an hour to complete, the refill kit may not be the way to go. However, if you have a chance to save tens of dollars and the steps do not seem cumbersome or time consuming, the Refill Kit can be the most advantageous. The Refill Kits provide enough liquid to fill the cartridges multiple times (around 4 to 8 times each) which can significantly reduce the cost to operate your printing machine.

The Final, and perhaps easiest way to obtain a refilled cartridge is to simply buy a Remanufactured ink cartridge. Remanufactured Ink Cartridges are simply refilled cartridges that have been returned or recycled to the vendor. The difference between filling an ink cartridge yourself and having the factory do it, is the testing steps. At the factory, all the cartridges have been cleaned and inspected before and after being refilled to ensure defective products do not get shipped out. They also have the volume to simply throw out or disregard any cartridges that can lead to potential issues. 

Ink or Toner?

Ink and toner share many similar aspects, both being able to administer color and black pigment onto media forming specified characters and integrated images that make up a printout. Each is comprised of three main elements, a vehicle, a pigment, and a holding cell. Both laser printers and inkjet printers also come in a variety types from All-In-One devices, being able to print, scan, copy, and fax, to monochrome machines that were designed to handle black and white or grayscale only printouts. These machines can be used for the same purposes, having the ability to complete nearly any type of printout, although toner and ink have distinct advantages and disadvantages depending on the type of printing you are performing. To help better understand which type of printer will be more beneficial, we have to first understand to main properties of ink and toner.

Printing ink is a liquid or paste based solution used to create shapes and patterns onto the substrate. The liquid solution is housed in a reservoir within the cartridge until being forced to the release chamber(s). Once inside the release chambers an impulse will trigger a reactive element embedded to the chamber to forcibly jet out or drop the pigment through a nozzle and out onto the media. The reaction will also force new droplets into the chamber for rapid reproduction.

Toner is a type of concentrated pigment or dye-based powder used in laser printers to complete the electrophotographic process. The powder is stored within the cartridge compartment known as the hopper. The powder in the hopper is a carbon-based polymer that will attract and repel from particular static electrical charges which is the key to applying the powder to the substrate. A transfer roller will pick up the oppositely charged toner particles from the hopper and roll the particles against an imaging drum unit that has an even greater opposite electrical charge. The laser printer will create a light impression on the drum successfully creating a magnetic impression for the toner to attract to. Once the toner is placed onto the media, a pair of fusing rollers will actually melt the powder into the page to create the desired images.

There are three main properties to consider when choosing whether to print with toner or ink, including how they dry, the structural design, and the optical output. With a laser toner printer, the fusing rollers will burn the toner that has been layered on the substrate to adhere the particles to the page. Inkjets will apply an ink solution that rapidly dries being exposed to the room temperature air. The speed at which the ink will dry varies, depending on the added drying or thermal agent inside the ink mixture.

The cartridges are also made in completely different sizes and shapes, with toners generally being much bigger in size due to the amount of components (or pieces) needed to apply the pigmented polymers. And having an entire roller covered in particles that spans the size of the accepted media and a drum unit that holds an image, allows the laser toner to swiftly reproduce that same image, which is ideal for printing out multiple copies of one page. Inkjet printers will slowly render and apply ink as the cartridges pass over the media to help capture fine details, making them better for single page printing.

Toners are made and formed with very specific particle solutions and processes that pertain to the particular printer model. For example, some toner particles can be shaped by a vortex procedure giving each grain a rounded shape, whereas the more typical chemically created particles contain jagged edges and can damage rollers that are made to transport rounded particles. Therefore, most toner cartridges will only work with a specific printer or series of printers. The inkjet cartridges, on the other hand, are often interchangeable with several printer series and even manufacturers. When the ink formulations are changed, the viscosity is usually balanced between inkjets allowing almost any printer to apply the contained ink as long as the cartridges have the same size and shape.

In general Inkjets will be able to produce higher quality images and photographs, whereas the toner particles are able to create higher quality text documents. The laser toners will also be able to produce more printouts due to the sheer amount of pigment able to be held by the toner cartridges as opposed to the ink cartridges. Ink cartridges are typically more expensive when comparing the cost to print per page although they can provide a wider color gamut to work with and added definition. So depending on what types of printing you are performing more of, will determine the type of printer and cartridges that will be more beneficial. For the photograph enthusiast, inkjets are recommended for added detail. To create multiple copies of a single page or text documents, a laser toner printer and toner cartridges will be better for your overall printing needs.

Cheap Printer Ink for Brother MFC Series Printers

Once again, Brother International has provided the business industry with an innovative tool that can do everything that your office may need or want. The Brother MFC series are multifunctional units that do the job of a copier, printer, scanner, fax and even, in some ways, a computer. This versatile machine is a business wiz, saving money, while doing any job faster and better than most single machines perform a single responsibility. Once again, Inkgrabber.com is your one-stop shop for all Brother MFC Series units at incredibly low cost to businesses looking for the absolute edge in printing innovation.

While Brother MFCs or All–in-Ones are a valuable tool for any business large or small, consumers aren’t left out of the biz-hub revolution. Brother offers personal MFCs like the Brother MFC 250C, as well as corporate beasts like the Brother MFC 9800. Both of those machines and everyone in between offer printing, copying, scanning, network capability and fax capability. With all these functions it is a good thing Inkgrabber.com is here, carrying all of the Genuine, Remanufactured and Compatible inkjet, toner and drum units you could need or want to supply your Brother MFC Series machine.

Besides a large stock of Genuine Brother Ink products, Inkgrabber.com is committed to providing remanufactured and compatible inkjet and toner that exceeds ISO9001 standards. And with the way MFC units can be used over time its important to consult the inkgrabber.com page yield reference that is included with each description of the toner cartridge or drum unit that fits your needs. Inkgrabber.com assures all inkjet products through our 90-Day Money Back Guarantee. If your toner cartridge or drum unit is damaged or does not fit your Brother MFC unit, we will exchange the product free of charge. In such case that you are completely dissatisfied with the quality of your purchase we will refund your money, no questions, no hassle. 

Be sure to sign up for the Inkgrabber.com newsletter where you can browse through discount codes and special coupons that may apply to your Brother MFC Ink Cartridge or other inkjet purchase that can save you, your business or both tons of money. If you have any questions concerning the compatibility or installation of any MFC ink cartridge or drum unit you can contact Inkgrabber.com’s crack customer service team at 877-INK-GRAB.  Use Inkgrabber.com for everything you require in MFC Inkjet as well as all of your other printer ink needs.

Printer Ink & Toner – Net 30 terms available for Schools & Gov’t Offices

Did you know that Inkgrabber.com accepts Open Billing for Schools & Government offices. Not only will we start you out on Net 30 terms, you’ll also be assigned a personal Account Representative to handle all your ordering questions. We’ll provide you with a unique login… making future purchases a snap. You’ll even earn “InkPoints” with every purchase, redeemable for the gift card of your choice. What are you waiting for? Sign up as an Inkgrabber.com Corporate Account Today! Fax your purchase orders to: 800-742-7480 to get started.


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