Posts Tagged 'what is ink made of'

Inside the Ink Cartridge

Most of us use printers in our everyday lives, whether it’s at work, home, or even in libraries and schools. Printers have long been a part of our culture, revolutionizing how we received news, how advertisers were able to relay messages, how stories and lessons were able to be recorded on a wide scale, and much more. The first printers were complex machines with a numerous variety of components and attachments and needed constant monitoring. Now, we see a printer and immediately know how to operate them, how to change the ink cartridges, and how to give them a proper supply of power. In general, these machines and their accompanying cartridges are pretty familiar and very simple to use, although we seldom look at what is really happening inside the ink cartridge during the printing process.

 The ink cartridge, although it looks uncomplicated and easily slides in and out of the printer when replacing the ink, is actually an intricate component with several moving, conducting, charging, and supporting pieces that make up a single ink cartridge.

The main components of every cartridge are the sump or receptacle portion which expels the ink and the peripheral walls, encasing the cartridge and giving the object its recognizable, rectangular shape (in most cases, although each manufacturer varies). These also happen to be the biggest and most prevalent pieces as they hold and protect the ink from spilling inside the printer.  The sump is also responsible for responding to and supporting the print heads, which act as a funnel to jet ink through to the media. The sump and the walls together, also make up a reservoir for the ink to rest in.

On the diametrically opposed side of the sump portion, designers usually include a small handle with a knurled surface to facilitate the insertion and removal of the ink cartridge. This basically means the cartridge has a protruding handle at the top and in the back of the unit for users to more easily handle the cartridge.  Along with an added handle, the outer portion also contains stabilizing protrusions or datum features at the bottom of the cartridge (much like a stand or feet) to accurately align the cartridge in the printer.

 At the bottom of the unit, a small hole known as the charging opening is also created into the frame or wall which grants access to the ink reservoir. This is where the ink is initially filled when being put together by the assembling machine.

In between the sump portion and the framing walls of the cartridge lies a recessed region which bisects the cartridge. These recessed regions taper off to angled edges known as the chamfers. The chamfers main purpose is to correctly position media when the media is passing by the sump portion of the cartridge. The sump is actually two laterally spaced plates, each with smooth metal faces and ribbed groves on the inner section of the plates to ensure the print head is adhesively secured (or connected) to the cartridge.

A flexible circuit board or flexible member is then added to the cartridge, situated on the sump portion and part of the peripheral wall portion. The circuit board is a crucial piece to the cartridge supporting electrical traces that provide power to an actuating mechanism and delivering electrical impulses to the necessary components inside the cartridge. An electrical impulse will be regulated then distributed to “pogo” pins, a piezo crystal, or an electrical resistance heating material (such as thermal inks) to expel the droplets out of the chamber and through the print head nozzles.

To supply power to the flexible circuit board, a series of “pogo” pins in the ink trough of a printer will touch the conductor strips on the circuit board of the cartridge, creating a pathway for electricity to travel through. Sometimes chips are also added onto cartridges to count the number of pages printed with a particular cartridge and to help big corporations and brand name manufacturers regulate and ultimately monopolize the ink markets.

These are generally the main pieces involved when comprising an ink cartridge, although each manufacturer and each printer series has their own versions, additions, and arrangements of ink cartridge compositions.  


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